Blog

hospice winston-salem
Wednesday June 19th, 2013

What is mild cognitive impairment?

"Senior moments" are a normal part of aging. They happen to everyone. We just don’t process things as quickly as we did in younger years. Some people develop significant memory and thinking problems, however, and are eventually unable to live safely on their own. These people have conditions that bring on a full-fledged dementia, such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease.
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday June 12th, 2013

Conflict Over Medical Decisions

Frequently in serious illness, treatment decisions must be made quickly. It is not uncommon for relatives to have differing ideas about the best course. Some may feel their loved one should pursue aggressive treatments. Others may feel that therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy do not offer enough benefits given their negative effect on the limited time their family member may have.
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday June 5th, 2013

What are Advanced Directives?

For help with this important conversation, the Living Will and Health Care Power of Attorney, contact the Community Partnership for End of Life Care. Advance directives are legal documents that specify your health care wishes if you are unable to speak for yourself. Each state has its own approved form. Most forms describe several options for end-of-life care and can be used to provide any additional instructions a person may want to include. You may change your advance directive whenever you choose.
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday May 29th, 2013

Look ahead when downsizing

It’s a big decision to have Mom or Dad move into a smaller living situation. Often more emotionally challenging, however, are the many little decisions your relative must make about what to keep and what to let go. Possessions, from furniture to garden tools, hold many dear memories. Giving them up forces recognition that one day your loved one's life will come to a close. The first step to reduce emotional strain is to allow plenty of time. Senior move experts recommend a minimum of three months lead-time. Consider these steps:
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday May 22nd, 2013

When the worrying won't stop

Worry is useful when it calls us to action. But it's a problem when it becomes an ongoing state of mind. It can become a habit, bringing tension and stress. If you're a worrier, you may have mixed feelings. It may seem that worry keeps you on your toes; yet it makes you edgy and distracted, interfering with your sleep and peace of mind. Relieving the stress of worry doesn't mean you have to stop worrying. Here are some strategies to harness the positives of worry and keep the rest in balance:
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday May 15th, 2013

Is your relative at risk for a hip fracture?

Bone fractures are more common than you might think. According to the National Osteoporosis Foundation, "a woman’s risk of breaking a hip due to osteoporosis is equal to her risk of breast, ovarian and uterine cancer combined. A man age 50 or older is more likely to break a bone due to osteoporosis than he is to get prostate cancer." Hip fractures are serious injuries that often result in an older adult's inability to live independently. People most likely to fracture a hip due to osteoporosis are:
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday May 1st, 2013

Stress and overeating

Caring for an ill family member is emotionally taxing. Ever use food for comfort? Sure, we all do. Eating favorite foods is a pleasure! And eating sugary or fatty foods appears to actually calm stress centers in the brain. But it's fleeting comfort. Such "emotional eating" may in fact ultimately add to your stress by leaving you feeling guilty. And it can certainly leave you with a few extra pounds!
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday April 24th, 2013

Do you know their wishes?

Suppose your loved one was in a coma or unable to speak. If you had to make healthcare decisions for him or her, would you know what to say? Making the choices that are right for your relative requires knowing his or her preferences in advance. But starting the conversation can feel awkward. Use a soft approach. Make it about your need to know versus their being frail. Choose a place that is comfortable and quiet. And allow plenty of time. Some possible starters:
hospice winston-salem
Wednesday April 17th, 2013

Stress and overeating

Caring for an ill family member is emotionally taxing. Ever use food for comfort? Sure, we all do. Eating favorite foods is a pleasure! And eating sugary or fatty foods appears to actually calm stress centers in the brain. But it's fleeting comfort. Such "emotional eating" may in fact ultimately add to your stress by leaving you feeling guilty. And it can certainly leave you with a few extra pounds!